JFK T4 +

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JFK T4+ Concourse Addition
Fourth Year
Instructor: Hal Hayes
Fall 2015
Project Location: JFK International Airport, New York City

Most passengers travel with only their destinations in mind, hoping to skip through the dreary airport experience. This design proposal aims to redesign the existing airport concourse experience by introducing the outdoors into the interior space. By doing so, the passengers can experience the beauty of being in an airport.The outdoor experience is emphasized by the structural system, which is a mixture of tensile and compressive structure. The roof is a double envelope with an inner layer of PTFE fabric membrane and an outer layer of ETFE plastic. The outer clear layer still lets light to reach the inner PTFE layer and sheds the heavy snow during the winter. The material allows for greater span and less material. Thus, in the proposed design, one bay is equivalent to two of the existing bays. The fabric creates an abundance of diffuse natural lighting in the space and is held in tension by cables that are attached to the column and portal frames. The frames act as an exoskeleton, wrapped around the building. The column is this breathing structure that becomes a return plenum that cleans the mechancially supplied air. Additionally, it is a vertical distributor for supply air and a rainwater filter and collector. These column bays are stagerred for lateral bracing and also makes the endless concourse feel less like an extrusion.
At the connection between the existing concourse and the new proposed design, a typical design bay is introduced as a gradual transition into the major retail node. Passengers walk through a larger version of the column in order to get to their holdrooms. The node consists of a double storey Duty Free shop on the North side and the sterile corridor on the south side. The Delta Sky Club is on the fourth floor overlooking the atrium space.